Gilbane – Integrating External and Internal Social Efforts to Maximize Business Performance

Ken Efta – Allyis

  • 180 consultants
  • How to bring together external efforts (e.g., Li and Bernoff’s Groundswell) with internal Enterprise 2.0 efforts (e.g., McAfee and Hinchcliffe)
  • Social Context and Social Fears
    • AIIM study: 80% of employees searches for interformation are on the Internet [and not on the company intranet]
    • Implicit that our intranet content isn’t good enough
    • What’s the social context:
      • What links do my top developers refer to often?
      • Which blogs to my top marketing consultants read?
    • All about understanding your people and the context they engage in.
    • Focus Group: “Social networking is evil, and I’d never let my employees use Facebook or Twitter on the job.”
      • Resistance to consumer social networks
      • Okay to be blogging, and for employees to participate in the blog
      • Acceptable to do some social media, but didn’t like the consumer things
  • Takeaways about context
    • Understanding people and culture is critical
    • External, consumer space still scares many people
    • Value of social connections around social content is evident
      • Participation rations: 1-9-90 (everyone should have the opportunity to participate)
      • Lots of value in just reading and learning what’s going on.
  • Braided Content Model
    • Drive greater engagement with partners served through a portal
    • Lots of editorially prepared content & also managing social networking communities (doing some sentiment analysis with Radian6)
    • Bring the presentation together in a portal and allow you to see things together
    • They are still trying to operationalize the feedback they are getting into the collaborative editorial process.
    • Have seen uptick in customer satisfaction
  • Wiki-based Collaboration
    • Non-profit responsible for video / television, events and educational outreach
    • Accountability to grantors for fiscal aspects and creative process
    • Grantors could log in and weigh in on ideas for creative approaches.
    • Moving portions of technical wiki out on to the customer Internet – soliciting ideas from the community
      • Building greater awareness
      • Process of creative community
  • Key considerations
    • Internal culture and the culture of your customers
    • The folks who pay the bills have lots of say
    • People are still scared of external social media
    • map out the complete life-cycle of your efforts and commit to managing them.

Randy Zeigler – EMC

  • Community Initiatives
    • Internal: EMC One
      • 15k+ members
      • 50k unique visitors
      • 2M pain views
      • 200 collaboration spaces (affinity groups and organizations)
      • Been a great initiative and doing it for the past 3 years
    • EMC Community network
      • Close to 90K members
      • 84% that are external stakeholders
      • Worldwide
      • Good growth rate
      • Variety: user groups that are private, EMC proven professionals, support forums
    • Using Jive social business software for internal and external spaces
    • KB-wiki
      • Had to go outside Jive to set up Wiki
      • Collaborative knowledgebase – They want to comment and they want to engage
      • Launched Q3 2009
      • 5000 members, 3 Wikis
  • Evolution
    • Started with Product Support Forums and Development Network
    • Moved to Laps and EMC Community Network; added EMC One; added Blogging Corp
      • Have had some growing pains since EMC has been traditionally a closed type company and this has forced them to be more open.
    • New models are Gallery and KB.Wiki
  • Drivers
    • EMC has encouraged people to experiment
    • Wanted to turn the power of the EMC ecosystem into a social force, they could make that a corporate asset
    • EMC wanted to host the conversation and be relevant
  • Convergence
    • It is very alluring to think about how you can bring 15k people inside the community and bring them together.
    • Idea of scaling engagement rapidly
    • EMC doesn’t consider themselves a success story yet — Scaling; Have the same vendor for a lot of what they do (not as advanced for some of the things they want to do).
    • There are very different infrastructure requirements internally and externally.
    • There’s a challenge of voice, being consistent and on message.
    • You want to get value out of the engagement you do have.
    • There’s only so much time you can spend on social networks. The value propositions are competing to the business owners. Spending a lot of time with the social networks, but what is that engagement value with partners, etc.
    • Security/Privacy is still a challenge.

David Rosenberg – Edelman

  • Two parallel paths when talking about internal and external spaces. Top executives already had their own blogs. How do you bring the external content in and aggregate it as one stream? How do we use that information / expertise and connect all the employees around the world? Rolled out internal facebook.
  • Bringing in Facebook and Twitter as part of the internal stream. Employees control what they want as part of their profile
  • Publish content from internal to external space. Allow more collaboration.
  • Social bookmarking: Employees can click a button and push the content out to the public page. Removing IT interventions.
  • Immediate sharing of inforamtion and facilitation of conversations – moving away from mailed PDF report on Friday afternoons and moving towards real-time.
  • Capturing ideas and collaboration. Creating self-service sites that don’t need IT support once its set up.

Question: Does Edelman allow users to control what profiles are imported.
Answer: Yes. Discussion about Edelman being a relatively progressive company and whether or not other companies that may be more conservative would want information like skateboarding or bowling on internal profiles.

Question: Technology behind service
Answer: Using Newsgator toolbar to allow publishing of content internally and externally.  Rolled out Sharepoint 2007 with Newsgator. Sharepoint 2010 has a lot of social pieces put in. Sharepoint & Newsgator together allowed the social piece to be already put in.

Question: Use of Jive in both external and internal
Answer:  EMC’s implementation of Jive currently forces them to have an internal and external profile. Hosted separately. Every version of software gains maturity.

Sharepoint 2010 allows you to push profile information from external profile into internal profile. One real profile store and then choosing what information is on each profile.

Question: Adoption rates and metrics; Cultural challenges
David – One of the metrics was how many people actually created their home page; filled out their profile. Seeing a lot more profiles put in – social aspect and number of people contributing. Putting tools into place that made their life easier. Having the files that they were using for collaboration.
Randy – Internally, we’ve gone through “more is better” — measures of participation are users that created their profile. Any activity is good activity. That internally has now shifted to looking more at the social aspects are hard to quantify, but the focus on the business value to the groups that are trying to reinvent process. Lot of groups that are trying to offer unified architectures. People working all over the world and you need to bring those people together.
Randy – Externally the goal was to host the conversation, target certain audiences that were core to doing business and wanted to take the conversation to them. Adoption rate is important, but user generated rate of content and people connecting with each other (answering questions, etc.) is a metric they are focused on.
Ken – Unfiltered stream of social messages coming through was 1000s. Trying to identify the individuals that were doing high-value brought it down to dozens. Type of examples of the type of engagement they wanted. Portal was supporting sales and marketing and technical partners. Saw much higher engagement from technical partners.
Question: Adoption rates and metrics; Cultural challenges

David – One of the metrics was how many people actually created their home page; filled out their profile. Seeing a lot more profiles put in – social aspect and number of people contributing. Putting tools into place that made their life easier. Having the files that they were using for collaboration.

Randy – Internally, we’ve gone through “more is better” — measures of participation are users that created their profile. Any activity is good activity. That internally has now shifted to looking more at the social aspects are hard to quantify, but the focus on the business value to the groups that are trying to reinvent process. Lot of groups that are trying to offer unified architectures. People working all over the world and you need to bring those people together.

Randy – Externally the goal was to host the conversation, target certain audiences that were core to doing business and wanted to take the conversation to them. Adoption rate is important, but user generated rate of content and people connecting with each other (answering questions, etc.) is a metric they are focused on.

Ken – Unfiltered stream of social messages coming through was 1000s. Trying to identify the individuals that were doing high-value brought it down to dozens. Type of examples of the type of engagement they wanted. Portal was supporting sales and marketing and technical partners. Saw much higher engagement from technical partners.

Randy – People’s expectations in the space vary widely.

David – Edelman’s culture is different because they are already doing a lot of things externally. In terms of culture, have launched a reverse mentoring program for younger people already engaged on social media to teach those that aren’t about what they are doing and how they are working with social media.

Ken – At the heart of closing the loop is when you’re engaging to do those things and reaching out to customers, it’s all about relationships. You’re forging a relationship with customers and their peers. Every executive really likes getting out there and having the conversations with customers, this is just a better way to do it.